PAUL’S MINISTRY

PHOTO FROM PEXELS PHOTOS

1 and 2 Thessalonians 

Study 2

Paul’s Ministry

“For you yourselves know, brothers and sisters, that our [a]reception among you was not in vain, but after we had already suffered and been treated abusively in Philippi, as you know, we had the boldness in our God to speak to you the gospel of God [b]amid much [c]opposition. For our exhortation does not come from error or impurity or [d]by way of deceit;but just as we have been approved by God to be entrusted with the gospel, so we speak, not intending to please people, but to please God, who [e]examines our hearts. For we never came [f]with flattering speech, as you know, nor with a pretext [g]for greed—God is our witness— nor did we seek honor from people, either from you or from others, though [h]we could have [i]asserted our authority as apostles of Christ. But we [j]proved to be [k]gentle [l]among you. As a nursing mother [m]tenderly cares for her own children, in the same way we had a fond affection for you and were delighted to share with you not only the gospel of God, but also our own [n]lives, because you had become [o]very dear to us.”

“For you recall, brothers and sisters, our labor and hardship: it was by working night and day so as not to be a burden to any of you, that we proclaimed to you the gospel of God. 10 You are witnesses, and so is God, of how devoutly and rightly and blamelessly we [p]behaved toward you [q]believers; 11 just as you know how we were exhorting and encouraging and imploring each one of you as a father would his own children, 12 so that you would walk in a manner worthy of the God who calls you into His own kingdom and glory.

Brief recap: In our first study (1 and 2 Thessalonians) we saw the beginning of Paul’s thoughts toward these believers in Thessalonica. Paul is thinking back to the time that he was personally with them ministering to them. He reflected on their own suffering (Silas, Timothy, and himself) in bringing the gospel to them (Acts 16-17). He expressed how the gospel came to them in “power and in the Holy Spirit” (vs. 5), and how they, under “much tribulation,” received the gospel and turned “to God from idols to serve a living and true God” (vs. 9). He reflected on their strong testimony to others; those in their local community, and those in the surrounding regions (vs.8). And being encouraged by Timothy’s report of their well being, mentioned with much joy their watchfulness and perseverance as they waited for Christ Jesus to return. Paul with much love and joy in his heart for these new believers in this newly formed church, commends them for their faith and their application of it in their daily lives.

Brief intro: In this study we will be focused on Chapter 2:1-12. Paul, in remembering his time with them, now reflects back to their coming to them and reminds them of what it cost him and his friends personally to bring the gospel to them. He also reminds them of how they conducted themselves among them when they were with them. 

Focus one: In verses one and two Paul reminds them of the manner in which they came to them in Thessalonica. We should take notice to the language Paul uses in this section (“For you yourselves know,” “You recall,” “You are witnesses,” and “just as you know”) are terms he uses throughout to express the correctness of what he is saying to them. These are things that they could not honestly deny. It appears that there may have been some false accusations floating around about Paul and his friends and their ministry, and so *“this defense gives us insight into the nature of the ministry of the gospel in the early church,” especially the beginning missionary efforts.

Paul and his companions had been “mistreated” in Philippi (Acts 16), and yet with unhealed wounds on their bodies from being beaten, hunger and weakness from imprisonment, and traveling approximately 100 miles to get to Thessalonica, amid “much opposition,” they boldly speak the gospel to them! 

Should their motives be suspect as may have been falsely propagated? Not at all. These men acted with great courage in bringing the gospel to them. The physical, emotional, and mental struggles they had to face in order to be faithful to their calling were tremendous. If it were not for their divine calling they most likely would not have come to Thessalonica and thereby escape more abuse and harsh treatment. 

They spoke with integrity. Their motives were pure. They did not use flattery, deceit, or cunning tricks to get them to believe their message. They did not suffer what they did for human praise, nor did they pretend to be their friends to get them to trust them. No, quite the opposite! They came in obedience to the Lord, to please Him not men (vs. 4). They came because they were called of God (2 Timothy 1:1) and “approved” by God to be entrusted with the gospel (vs. 4; 1 Timothy 2:5-7).

Focus 2: Not only were their motives pure, their methods were as well!  They did not come authoritatively although they could have (vs.6). *“The thought of this passage is obvious: they didn’t even take what they had a right to because they were so motivated to get the gospel out.” Impure motives and methods? Obviously not. Pauls says that they “became gentle among them as a nursing mother cares for her own children” (vs.7). And exhorting, encouraging, and  imploring them as “a father would his own children” (vs.11). These metaphors are of a loving, self-sacrificing relationship between a mother and father and their children, whom they care deeply about, and The apostles care and concern for these young converts. As a mother and father physically nurture and provide for their children in hope that they will mature, exercise wisdom and prosper in their lives, so these men spiritually nurtured and cared for them. They also prayed earnestly for their lives to be blessed of God. 

Focus 3: Paul’s desire for these young believers was that they would “walk in a manner worthy of God” (vs.12). The New Testament widely uses this term “walk” in reference to our manner of conduct (2 Corinthians 5:7; Ephesians 2:10; Colossians 2:6; 1 John 2:6). In other places in the New Testament we find other phrases that mean the same thing. For example: “Walk in a manner worthy of the calling with which you have been called” (Ephesians 4:1). “Only conduct yourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ” (Philippians 1:27). “So that you may walk in a manner worthy of the Lord” (Colossians 1:10)

Paul is concerned about their fruitfulness or lack thereof at the return of Christ. He says: “so that you may walk worthy of the God who “calls you into His own kingdom and glory” (vs.12). “This is an incentive to a high quality of life.” The “God who calls” us is a God of holiness, righteousness, and goodness. He commands those He redeems back from the curse of sin to be holy as He is holy (1 Peter 1:15-17). To be “imitators of God, as beloved children” (Ephesians 5:1). To have the “mind” of Christ (Philippians 2:5). In other words, to live lives that are reflective of His character and nature.

This is a manner of living that cannot be accomplished by our own efforts no matter how noble and zealous we may be. We can only walk in such a way if the Spirit of God indwells us. For that to happen we must be “born again,” i.e., saved or redeemed (Ephesians 4:30; 1 Corinthians 2:14). (Gospel)

 As we proceed through these letters we will naturally sense more of Paul’s fatherly (spiritual) concern for these believers as we observe him comforting, strengthening, and discipling them in their walk of faith.

For further thought:

  • What character traits are essential for gospel ministry? 
  • What various methodologies for ministry do we find in churches today? Are some more helpful than others” More harmful? Why?
  • Should integrity matter in ministry? Why or why not?
  • How important is obedience in the Christian life (vss. 10-12)?
  • Paul had a gentle heart for people. He was willing to face opposition to get the gospel to others. Are you willing? Why or why not? What needs to change?

David Ewert Commentary on the Bible, Pg. 1072

Benjamin C. Chapman Commentary on 1 and 2 Thessalonians

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