TO FAMILIAR

Mark 6:1-6

BRIEF INTRO:

Ever heard the expression: “Familiarity breeds contempt.” That phrase’s meaning is plain: The more extensive knowledge or association that we have of someone or something typically leads to a loss of respect for them. That is what we witness in our following study. Jesus was simply “to familiar” to those in His hometown that they could not OR would not believe Him to be anyone OR anything remotely more special than themselves. Matthew 13:54-58 shares a similar account.

This familiarity also tends to lead to boredom with a person or thing because we have too much experience with them and know what to expect.

This study may not be full of profound doctrine or theology, per se, but it does provide two essential things for us today:

  1. It reveals the unbelief in those closest to Jesus and why.
  2. It gives us a warning to check our hearts, so we don’t make the same mistake.

Jesus went out from there and *came into [a]His hometown; and His disciples *followed Him. 2 And when the Sabbath came, He began to teach in the synagogue; and [b]the many listeners were astonished, saying, “Where did this man learn these things, and what is this wisdom that has been given to Him, and such [c]miracles as these performed by His hands? 3 Is this not the carpenter, the son of Mary and brother of [d]James, Joses, Judas, and Simon? And are His sisters not here with us?” And they took offense at Him.

FOCUS ONE: To familiar in his hometown, so they won’t listen to his wisdom

Jesus was consistent! His custom was to teach in the synagogue on the Sabbath (Matthew 4:23). Jesus was compassionate towards the people and wanted them to come out of the darkness into His marvelous light (1 Peter 2:9). He humbled Himself, even to the point of death; death on a cross (Philippians 2:5-11). And how much more compassionate might He be in His hometown among His friends and family?

We are told that they recognized positive characteristics in Him (wisdom, miracle-working power). *”They acknowledged the two great proofs of the divine original of His gospel – the divine wisdom and the divine power, and yet, though they could not deny the premises, they (would not) admit the conclusion.”

As astonishing as these things were, they would certainly not make them think of Jesus any differently, especially as divine. “Is not this the carpenter. . .” They saw Him as a peer who did menial labor as they did, so they were not impressed with His humility.

Even though they were astonished (ἐξεπλήσσοντο), they weren’t moved to belief! That Greek word I have above comes out of two words: ek (out of) and plesso’ (to strike). This is a powerful word 1 “often meaning to drive one out of his senses by a sudden shock.”

They were amazed at His wisdom, BUT because of their familiarity with Him and His family, took offense at Him rather than placing their faith in Him!

Jesus went out from there and *came into [a]His hometown; and His disciples *followed Him. 2 And when the Sabbath came, He began to teach in the synagogue; and [b]the many listeners were astonished, saying, “Where did this man learn these things, and what is this wisdom that has been given to Him, and such [c]miracles as these performed by His hands? 3 Is this not the carpenter, the son of Mary and brother of [d]James, Joses, Judas, and Simon? And are His sisters not here with us?” And they took offense at Him.

FOCUS TWO: To familiar in His synagogue so they won’t submit to his authority and power

They knew His family. And even though they were astonished at His teaching, “they were offended at His person and for that reason would not believe”
Often that is the case with us in our culture today. I witnessed this phenomenon in one or two local churches I was a member in back in the day. Some people seemed to have a hard time benefiting from the speaker (lay speaker in these cases) simply because they knew him and his history and therefore struggled with submitting to His teachings.

What I am referring to is nowhere near the issue taking place in this account of Mark, but it stems from the same rotten fruit: familiarity!

These questions then became derogatory: “Is not this the carpenter” (common laborer). “The son of Mary” (A man was not described as his mother’s son in Jewish usage even if she was a widow, except by insult. CR Judges 11:1-2; John 8:41). “His brothers and sisters” were well known—people of similar circumstances.

So, since the hometown folk could not explain Jesus, His teaching, and his power to do miracles, it led them to take offense at Him, someone not unlike them (in their thinking).

4 Jesus said to them, “A prophet is not dishonored except in [a]his hometown and among his own relatives, and in his own household.” 5 And He could not do any [b]miracle there except that He laid His hands on a few sick people and healed them. 6 And He was amazed at their unbelief.

And He was going around the villages, teaching.

FOCUS THREE: To familiar with his relatives, so won’t look to Him for compassion

It is so sad reading those verses. Jesus was disrespected and given no honor in all places in His hometown. We can’t even begin to fathom the childhood of Jesus. Did He get into trouble? Did He have a bad attitude? Was He lazy and withdrawn with His face in an iPhone all day disobeying His parents? Obviously not!

Far from that picture, we would believe Jesus to be obedient, helpful, a hard worker, joyful! The townspeople would have noticed such character as he grew up. They should know that He was different than the other children in many ways. So, it is striking that they would have so much trouble now!

Jesus “wondered” at their unbelief. This word is a different Greek word than what Mark used in verse two. This word is ( θαυμάζω,v {thou-mad’-zo} it means:
1) to wonder, wonder at, marvel 2) to be wondered at, to be had in admiration.” It is not as strong a word as what was used to describe the people in verse two.

“There was no limitation of His power, but His purpose was to perform miracles in the presence of faith. Only a few here had faith to come to Him for healing.” it is sad to read that because of their persistent unbelief, “He could do no miracle there except that He laid His hand on a few sick people and healed them” (v. 5).

“So far as is known, He never returned to Nazareth.”

PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS FOR US:

  1. 1. Are we so familiar with our bible that we don’t spend much time with it?
  2. 2. Are we too familiar with our churches that we don’t attend regularly?
  3. 3. Are we so familiar with our brothers and sisters in Christ that we would rather avoid them?
  4. 4. Are we too familiar with the gospel that we no longer experience wonder at it?

• Matthew Henry
• Word Studies in the NT