RIGHT LIVING AND THE GOSPEL

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 Philippians 1:27-28

Study 5

BRIEF INTRO: These passages mark a change in focus from what Paul had written about in the first part of this letter. In the previous passages (12-26), Paul wrote about what had been happening with him (in prison). In verses 3-11, Paul had expressed his relationship (to) and thoughts (about) the Philippian believers, including his prayer for them. He was thankful to God for them because of their faithful participation with him in the gospel of Jesus Christ. He was confident of God’s continued work in them and so-could-pray- with all confidence that they would “abound still more and more in real knowledge and all discernment so that they may approve the things that are excellent in order to be sincere and blameless until the day of Christ.” (10)

In verses 12-26, we looked at the last time we were together; Paul explained his situation and response. He was imprisoned, and there were Christians, some who were seeking to cause him additional distress, preaching Christ from envy and selfish ambition. Paul realized that God was using all of this in his ministry to the praetorian guards that were watching him and even beyond it, encouraging others to be bolder in their proclamation of the gospel.

Paul rejoiced that Christ was being proclaimed regardless of the motives of the preachers or his circumstances. We saw that while Paul thought that he would survive his imprisonment to continue in ministry to them, he also knew that he could also die, but for Paul, to live was Christ and to die was gain (21), so either outcome would be deliverance for him.

As we come to verses 27-28 in this study, we find that Paul changes the focus (from himself) to the Philippians. The transition in vs. 27 is straightforward, and he now begins to address specific issues with them.

FOCUS ONE: Paul now begins to speak of their conduct, their behavior as “saints in Christ Jesus (as he called them in vs.1). Some people think and live as if their conduct after salvation is not that important; after all, they say, I attend church, read my bible and pray, so what’s the problem?

The problem is two-fold. First, and it should be evident to all of us, there is more to the Christian life than attending church, reading our bibles, and praying. All of those things are reasonable and necessary for a Christian to practice. Without them, we would be weak, immature, and cold in our walk of faith. But God is also concerned with how we conduct ourselves, not only inside the church but also outside. There is a particular way, now that we have been redeemed, in which we are to live our lives! Our New Testament is very instructive on this topic.

The second thing I would say is that our scripture is very clear about how we are to conduct ourselves as forgiven, Justified, and adopted children of the living God. Now, this may not be evident to us in reading our translations this morning. Still, I think as we look at this a little deeper, as we delve into the original language, we will see God’s clear intention (and that begins for us) by zooming in on the words “conduct yourselves.” What does that mean? Why is it so significant to grasping everything else Paul is saying to these believers in the following verses?

We find the answer to those questions by turning to chapter 3:20. Here we see in Greek a different form of the word we are looking at in verse 27 in our text. I want you to take special notice that our “citizenship,” and that is the critical word here, our citizenship is in Heaven. The term used in Greek is (pol-it-yoo-mah). Paul was very wise in using this word here, as he also was, as we will see back in chapter one, where he used another form from the same root word. 

But first, try to imagine this. It is the year 1944, and Germany is at war with England. Now suppose you have dual citizenship in both Germany and England, and you are living in Germany. How will you be treated?

Conversely, suppose you have dual citizenship in Germany and England and live in England during the Blitz; how would you be treated?

In either case, you would be forced to renounce your citizenship in the opposing country and declare your loyalty to the country in which you found yourself in that dreadful time. There would be no middle ground.

They would have never allowed dual citizenship in Germany and England during WWII, and we cannot have dual citizenship in this world. They are diametrically and violently opposed to one another! We cannot belong to the Kingdom of God by living in Christ AND belong to the kingdom of darkness at the same time.

At this time in their history, the people of Philippi were living as (colonists) while their “citizenship” was in Rome. They had rights and privileges afforded to them as such, and with those rights and freedoms came rules, expectations, and obligations for them, as citizens of Rome, to respect and fulfill.

In the same way, Christians, you and I, if you have trusted in Christ for your salvation, live on this earth as citizens of the United States of America, and with that comes rules, obligations, and responsibilities. But we also have our citizenship elsewhere, in HEAVEN! We have “Dual” citizenship, if you will. One is temporary and fleeting, the other eternal and unchangeable! We live as citizens of America and are very proud of that citizenship. With it comes rights and privileges only Americans have, but also, with that being said, the place we now belong to, the place that expects our full allegiance, the place that accepts us as its own is Heaven, and that is all because of what Jesus has completed for us! We have a “homeland,” we have a king, we have rights and privileges afforded to us BECAUSE we are citizens of Heaven.

That is what Paul is saying in chapter three. But back in 1:27 (turn there), Paul uses the same word with a different ending to encourage these believers to live appropriately (here, he uses the word pol-it-yoo-om- ahee). These words “conduct yourselves” translate a political term that would mean a lot to the Philippian believers. These Philippians were proud of their status as Roman Citizens (Acts 16:12, 20, 21). The earlier members of this church in Philippi would remember that Paul used his Roman citizenship to bring about a speedy, dignified release from prison (Acts 16). So, this imagery is rich in its cultural background, and Paul pointedly uses the imagery to challenge these believers and US, as we read it, to live as those who have higher and vastly more effective citizenship, that one we read about in 3:20!

Church, this is important for us to understand because the word used here for “conduct yourselves” means “behave as a citizen.

A citizen of what? HEAVEN!

FOCUS TWO: Because these believers are citizens of Heaven (as seen in 3:20) and the Lord is their king, Paul encourages them to behave as a citizen of the king would behave! And take notice too, that Paul makes it very clear that they are to act this way whether he is around or not, whether he comes to see them or not (27).

But this is not the only place Paul speaks of their obedience. Look over at chapter 2, verse 12. Paul is acknowledging that they are obedient believers! They are not “men pleasers,” playing a game. No, they, he says, are even “much more in his absence”! In other words, Paul said there, and he says here, that citizens of Heaven are to be consistent in their behavior to honor their King, King Jesus, whether they are being watched or not.

Dear Christian, how is your behavior these days? Are you striving to live, God helping you, as a consistent, faithful, persevering citizen of Heaven? Are you conducting yourself in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ, as Paul here states?

Well, the “manner” in which Paul instructs these believers to live was undoubtedly a needed reminder. They were struggling with disunity (Euodia and Syntyche 4:2), false teaching (3:1), and opposition from within and without (1:28), so how “pastoral” of Paul to remind and encourage them with these truths.

So, with all that in mind, let’s dig into this a bit deeper.

FOCUS THREE: “(Only) conduct yourselves (imperative) in a manner worthy of the gospel.”

Paul has only one thing that he is concerned about here, “only” this, how these believers should behave.

 I am going to quote someone here that is much more able in the Greek language than I am, and I am stressing the point here because it is so crucial to our understanding of everything else Paul says here: 

“Now, this verb (conduct yourselves), I want to tell you four things very quickly about this verb. It is in the present tense. And the impact of this is that Paul is saying, ‘Every moment of every day you are to conduct yourself in a manner worthy of the gospel. This is to be your daily lifestyle’. So, number one, it is in the present tense. This is a permanent obligation. As long as you are on this earth, it is obligatory that you conduct yourself in this manner. Second, it is in the middle voice. And when they parse a verb, that means that the responsibility lies with every one of us. It is not active. It is not passive. It is in the middle, which means we must take the reins and assume this responsibility for ourselves. This is a decision that each one of us must be daily and continually making. No one else can make this choice for us.

This is not merely for (some) believers in Philippi. This is for (every) believer in Philippi, but it is also for every believer, in every church, in every generation, on every continent, in every place. Third, it is in the imperative mood, which means it is a command. It is not an indicative statement (narrative). It is an imperative /command. It is not a mere wish. It is not a desire that Paul has for them. This is a commandment from God, through the apostle Paul, that requires the immediate obedience of every believer who has citizenship in the kingdom of God.”

With that being said, Flip back over to Phi 2:12-13. There is something else that needs to be observed there in our study. “So then, my beloved, even as you have always obeyed, not only in my presence, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling. For it is God who works in you both to (will) and to (work), for his good pleasure.”

There is a lot packed into those few verses, and we cannot think through it all in this study, but I want you to notice who is working in us (God) and the results of His work (will, work).

We cannot be obedient without God doing this work in us! That should be so encouraging, Christian.

“Friends, are you a citizen of the kingdom of God? Have you entered into this kingdom by the new birth, by trusting in Christ alone for forgiveness of your sins? Then if so, this is directed at every one of us.”

PRESUMPTION

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EXTENDED READING: 1 Samuel 6: 1-21

DEVOTIONAL VERSE:  Verse 19

“We like to think that because we believe the right doctrine and belong to the right church we can always count on the Lord’s blessing in our lives. Israel believed their covenant with God and the presence of the ark in battle would assure them of victory over the Philistines. They lost the battle and the ark was captured by the enemy.”

    “The Philistines also believed their idol to be superior to God until it fell and broke in pieces when the ark was placed beside it. The inhabitants of every city where the ark was placed were plagued with tumors. When the ark was returned, the Israelites who received it were punished for looking inside contrary to the law.”

    We learn a valuable lesson from this historical account. The lesson is this: that even those in a covenant relationship with God cannot expect His blessing when they are (disobedient) to His laws and commandments.

    Presumption, or “going beyond the limits of what is permitted or deemed acceptable,” regarding God’s holiness and kindness towards us, will always end up with His chastening hand upon us, not His blessings (Hebrews 12:6). God loves us and desires to bless us, but His holiness is always foremost in all His doings! 

“Because God’s holiness is a function of His transcendence, because he is high and exalted, nothing in creation can match the Lord in His glory, power, and purity.”

So, let us each day walk with faith and in obedience to His revealed will for us, not presuming upon Him more than he has promised (Romans 15:18)!

PRAYER: Father, forgive us for those times we tend to presume upon you things that we shouldn’t, or expect more than you promised. Please help us to regard your dignity and majesty above all else, so that our lives would be lived by faith and your name lifted up among the lost. Amen.

*Adapted from the Topical Chain Study Bible , 1983

  • * Quote from Ligonier Ministries article, “the meaning of holiness.”

EVER ASK WHY?

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Devotional reading: Genesis 2

Devotional verses: 16-17


In Genesis 2, we find that God, the creator of all things (Chapter 1), provided a perfect environment for Adam and Eve to flourish (1:31). He placed the man in the Garden that He planted in the east, the garden of Eden, and planted all sorts of beautiful trees that would produce much fruit, delicious fruit! The Lord God instructed Adam by giving him a clear command not to partake of the fruit of ONLY one tree in the garden, the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, “for the day you eat from it you shall surely die” (2:17). The Lord then creates the animals and then, by causing a deep sleep to come upon Adam, makes a woman from one of his ribs to be his wife because “it is not good for the man to be alone” (2:18).

“God forbade Adam and Eve to eat from a single tree. Why did He do this? Why didn’t God create a world where people couldn’t sin? Or why didn’t He make people so they couldn’t disobey His commands? The answer lies in the very nature of God. God is love and desires to have a loving relationship with His creatures. He wants us to respond to him with love in return. But a loving response is only possible when we have the choice to do otherwise. He wants us to obey because we love Him, not because we have no other choice” (John 14:15; 1 John 5:2).

PRAYER: Lord God, you are good beyond all measure and gracious in the manner in which you care for us. Your love is immense and eternal; we love you because you first loved us! Help us in our daily routine to express our love for you by being obedient to your will for us. Strengthen us when we are weak, encourage us when we are discouraged in the battle, and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil; we pray. Amen.

*Adapted from Every man’s bible

APPRECIATE YOUR LEADERS

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1 Thessalonians 5:12-13

STUDY 9

In the following 11 verses, Paul gives many appeals to the Thessalonians regarding their conduct moving forward. Some of these are concerning their leaders, some direct their behavior as a congregation, and a few are aimed at their own individual Christian life but are relatable to the church body as a whole. Our focus in this study will be only on verses 12-13.

“But we request of you, brethren, that you appreciate those who diligently labor among you, and have charge over you in the Lord and give you instruction, and that you esteem them very highly in love because of their work. Live in peace with one another.”

FOCUS ONE: We must remember that Paul is writing these instructions to a very young church (Acts 16-17). It seems that Paul would have appointed its Elders shortly after its formation and his sudden, unexpected need to leave them. Persecution began quickly, so Paul and Silas went to Berea. These Elders would be men who lived lives that were above reproach (1 Timothy 3:1-7). Men who would be keeping watch over their souls, giving an account of their service to the Lord one day (Hebrews 13:17). Men who were not to lord it over anyone but who would humbly recognize and acknowledge that it is by the Holy Spirt that they have been made “overseers” to the church of God in Thessalonica.

These men worked hard at caring for the people, and their labor was added to their usual 9-5 workday. So, their efforts were indeed a “labor of love” towards their brothers and sisters in Christ!

In verse 12, Paul requests this church body to “appreciate,” or some other translations may use the words “know” or “recognize,” those men who labor among them as Elders. Paul does not mean that they should be able to point them out at a church service or when walking down a street, although they certainly should be able to do that. Paul is speaking in more of a personal, relational aspect. They should personally know their leaders by interacting with them; through co-laboring among them. He wants them to take notice of their labor among them and to recognize their efforts for the sake of Christ and His body. To acknowledge God’s calling and gifting for this work and the sacrifices they are making daily on their behalf.

FOCUS TWO: He mentions three ways in which these Elders minister to them:

  1. They diligently labor among you.
  2. They have charge over you.
  3. They give you instructions.

To labor means that they give a continuous effort at unending care for the body. Having charge over or “overseeing,” implies that these men lead them in a God-honoring direction. Their instruction would come through preaching, teaching, counseling, and exercising discipline through the proper use of the word of God.

And, it is as essential for us today as it was for them to recognize how Paul qualifies their leadership; “in the Lord.” Their salvation and ministry among them are all a result of the grace of God in their lives. That is why leaders are not to act superior to those they serve (1 Peter 5:3).

FOCUS THREE: And so, because of all the above mentioned, Paul requests that the church body “esteem them very highly in love.” He wants them to respect these men, NOT because of their talents or personality, But because of their faithful ministry to them in obedience to Christ Jesus their Lord!

So, just as Paul clarified the character of their service (in the Lord), He now does the same regarding how the body is to esteem these men (in love.) There may be no personal reason for the respect of a brother or sister. There may be no “perceived” personal benefit from their labor; even so, Paul is saying, respect or appreciate them anyway because of the nature of their calling and its benefits to others!

Lastly, in verse 13, Paul writes, “live in peace with one another.” This may appear to be off-topic, but I assure you Paul had a purpose for writing these words. When spiritual leaders live and serve in these ways and the congregation submits to their leadership, in love, and with respect, peace is the result! 

FOR FURTHER THOUGHT:

  1. 1. How well do you know the spiritual leaders within your church? In what ways do you show your support for them?
  2. 2. According to 1 peter 5:1-3, what is the primary function of a pastor or Elder in the local church?
  3. 3. How has your understanding regarding the relationship between Elders and the congregation been informed or changed as a result of these scriptures? How? If so, how will it affect your relationship with your Elders moving forward?

WHAT ARE YOUR AMBITIONS IN LIFE?

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1 Thessalonians 4:11-12

Study 7

A brief recap: The church at Thessalonica was maturing, they were growing in “the grace and knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ (2 Peter 3:18), and Paul was aware of it. Spiritual growth is progressive and should never be stifled or assumed to have come to completion in our lives as long as we breathe on this side of heaven. Paul’s desire was for these folks to continue growing in their love for and obedience to Christ.

In our previous study, I talked about Paul’s encouragement and exhortations for these believers to “excel still more” in what they already were practicing, brotherly love. Paul knew something that we need reminded of: there is always room for improvement!

In the following two verses, Paul gives more instructions on how they ought to conduct themselves, but this time concerning those outside the church. Remember, in our last study I pointed out that two themes emerge (Love of the brethren and their behavior among those outside the church), and two groups are now mentioned (insiders and outsiders). Paul here begins addressing our second theme and its relation to those outside the church.

11 and to make it your ambition to lead a quiet life and attend to your own business and work with your hands, just as we instructed you, 12 so that you will [a]behave properly toward outsiders and [b]not be in any need.

FOCUS ONE: What ambitions do you have for your life? What goals are you seeking to accomplish? Do they include any of these Paul mentions in verse 11? 

  • Live a quiet life.
  • Mind (attend) your own business.
  • Work with your hands.

Before we move on in our study, we need to understand what Paul means by these three things. Paul is not saying that believers should take a vow of silence and not verbally communicate with others. He implies that believers should actively pursue living a less frantic life, not a less involved one. Not a silenced life but one undistracted from their walk with God. (1) “A person who is constantly on the move is frequently a bother to other people as well as somewhat distracted from his/her own walk with God.”

By minding your own business, Paul is expressing the obvious. Proverbs 25:17 says: “Let your foot rarely be in your neighbors house lest he become weary of you and hate you.” This instruction is connected to the latter in that a meddlesome spirit often accompanies a hectic life! We are to be active in keeping our affairs in order, not meddling in others.

The third instruction to work with your hands implies that idleness was becoming a problem among the Thessalonians. They lived in a Greek culture that degraded manual labor, while Christianity “viewed it as an honorable pursuit.” Since most of the Thessalonians earned their living with their hands, Paul encourages them to continue to do so and avoid the snare of idleness.

FOCUS TWO: What appears at first to be a change of topic, from loving others to behavior, actually isn’t! Paul seeks to help these believers understand that everyday habits of living manifest love or the lack of it towards others. Such behavior towards those on the inside manifests love for one another in how we esteem each other more highly than ourselves (Philippians 2:3). Paul also knows that such behavior does win the respect of non-Christians (outsiders). People appreciate those who do not take advantage of them.

 To sum this up, Paul seems to be advocating for personal responsibility in the Christian life. Personal maturity is powerful evidence of a maturing love for others. Those on the inside as well as those on the outside!

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From the subject of love to what seems quite different and unrelated-how we live in our communities, we find that they are not as diverse as we thought. Perhaps nothing disrupts peace and unity within a church more than its member’s unwillingness to participate in and shoulder their part within the local community. How does it impact a local body of believers when some of its members make no effort at their own support while taking advantage of other member’s generosity? It appears that Paul gave these exhortations because some of these folks may have been misapplying the truth’s taught by Paul when he was with them concerning the Lord’s return. But Paul makes it clear that our Lord’s return is never an excuse to evade our current responsibilities.

Paul wants their love for others to mature, and so he pens these goals for them because he knows that they are worthy objectives that will help them mature in this area of their Christian walk. These goals are worthy objectives for us today as well. 

FOR FURTHER THOUGHT:

  1. If you were to evaluate your life outside the walls of your local church, would your testimony be helpful or hurtful to non-Christians in your community? 
  2. In light of Paul’s divinely inspired words, how might your current ambitions need to be adjusted for you to grow in gospel love for others?
  3. What other biblical goals might you add to this study that will help you mature in your walk of faith?
  1. Thomas Constable commentary on 1 Thessalonians